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Dietitian Says Fad Diets Fail Over Long Term

Posted on May 31, 2000

By The London Free Press

Today, it’s grapefruit; tomorrow it’s cabbage. Fad diets go in and out of style like a revolving door. Many of today’s fad diets promise consumers a “magic bullet” for quick and effortless weight loss. But can diets that make these promises deliver results? No, says Diane Quagliani, a dietitian and spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association. “Fad diets are a short-term, quick-fix approach to weight loss that don’t work over the long haul,” she says. “Food choices are often monotonous and caloric intake may be very restricted, so that once the novelty wears off, so does the motivation to continue.”

Launch of Hemp Foods Will Require Education

Tortilla chips, pasta, wraps and pate are among the foods containing hemp in a new line launched recently at two food shows in Toronto. Ruth’s Hemp Foods, made exclusively of Canadian-grown hemp, address a convergence of market trends—the interest in healthy, plant-based diets and the desire for quick-to-prepare meals. Ruth Shamai, the woman behind the line of foods, realizes that she’ll have to do a great deal of education to overcome common misconceptions about hemp. “People must understand that our foods contain no detectable THC (delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol) the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana,” she says. “In fact, hemp and marijuana plants are distant cousins which shouldn’t be confused.” Hemp seed and the inner hempnut, the parts of the plant used as food ingredients, are rich in protein and essential fatty acids (EFA). “While people are interested in reducing their total fat, there is still a need for essential fatty acids in the right proportions,” Shamai says. “The balance of EFA in hemp can help bring our diets closer to the ideal.” Other products in the line include hemp oil and hemp/flax oil.

Copyright © 2000, The London Free Press. All rights reserved.