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Flax and Hemp: From the Seed to the Loom

Posted on February 1, 1937

This country imports almost all of its fibers except cotton. The Whitney gin, combined with improved spinning methods, enabled this country to produce cotton goods so far below the cost of linen that manufacture practically ceased in the United States.

1931 Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 1, 1931

Hemp is one of the oldest of known textile fibers. There is a definite record that the hemp plant (Cannabis Sativa) was cultivated in China for fiber production 27 centuries before the Christian Era. For nearly 5,000 years it has been important and has won an honorable position because of its strength and durability and the well-established fact that it is dependable.

1917 Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 1, 1917

Although we have still only a small acreage devoted to hemp in the United States, the acreage has doubled each year for the last three years. The area planted in 1917 was estimated at 42,000 acres.

The Manufacture Of Paper From Hemp Hurds

Posted on October 14, 1916

At this time, its best to read online

1913 Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 1, 1913

The two fiber-producing plants most promising for cultivation in the central United States and most certain to yield satisfactory profits are hemp and flax. The oldest cultivated fiber plant, one for which the conditions in the United States are as favorable as anywhere in the world, one which properly handled improves the land, and which yields one of the strongest and most durable fibers of commerce, is hemp.

The 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica Entry on Hemp

Posted on January 1, 1911

Hemp, an annual herb (Cannabis sativa) having angular rough stems and alternate deeply lobed leaves. The bast fibres of Cannabis are the hemp of commerce, but, unfortunately, the products from many totally different plants are often included under the general name of hemp.

The 1909 Children’s Encyclopedia Entry on Hemp

Posted on January 1, 1909

We all know hemp as a roadside weed, tall, straight, with whorls of spreading, lady-finger leaves, all pitched at a downward slant, the flowers clustered at the bases of the leaves, as happens with all members of the stinging nettle family, to which hemp belongs.

1909 Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 1, 1909

Fiber Investigations — Hemp & Flax. Many plant fibers and many questions pertaining to fiber production have been investigated during the past year, but attention has been directed especially to hemp and flax, which, aside from cotton, are regarded as the most promising fiber-producing plants for this country.

1901 Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture

Posted on January 1, 1901

The hemp plant (Cannabis sativa) is an annual, belonging to the nettle family. It grows to a height of from 5 to 15 feet, and when cultivated for fiber (Pl. LXXIX, fig. 1) produces only a few small branches near the top of the slender stalk. Its leaves, of a rich dark-green color, are composed of 5 to 9 lanceolate, serrate, pointed leaflets, 2 to 5 inches in length and about one-sixth as wide.

The 1856 Encyclopedia Britannica Entry on Hemp

Posted on January 1, 1856

Hemp, a tough fibre yielded by the large annual plant Cannabis sativa, of the natural order Cannabinaceae. There are, however, several other fibres known in commerce to which the term is more or less commonly applied.